This top-selling, high-tech razor uses like new for up to seven years — and it’s on sale now

Shaving is one of those things in life that you love to hate — especially since it involves a contraption with sharp edges that could leave you with a cut or two after. It’s taken a while, but razors have evolved into something that can fit the needs of whoever is using it, regardless of what they’re looking for in their shave. There are razors that can shave dry, razors that can be thrown away after one use and razors combined with gel to ease the experience. The technology built in razors has evolved, too. Taking them from throw-away junk to smart technological necessities. One of these technological advanced razors is the Braun Series 9, made for wet or dry shaving. A top-seller at Walmart, this razor comes with a steeper price tag than one might expect for a shaver, but all of the built-in elements make this a long-lasting, everyday necessity. “Most incredible electric I have ever owned,” wrote a customer. “So happy I spent the extra money and got the best.” An auto-sensing motor shaves more hair in one stroke than any other shaver on the market, according to the product description. In one motion, 10,000 micro vibrations occur simultaneously to capture the most hair possibl...

When barber Dean Hudson, owner and operator of Dean’s Barber Shop in Dupo, posted on Facebook

When barber Dean Hudson, owner and operator of Dean’s Barber Shop in Dupo, posted on Facebook that he would be retiring Oct. 11, the response was remarkable.  Within 24 hours, about 2,000 people had contacted him to offer congratulations or reminisce with him.   Dean’s Barber Shop, and by extension Hudson, has been a pillar of the Dupo community since it opened in 1972.  Hudson, a Dupo native, had originally planned to work in construction, but he injured his knees while playing high school football.  “I don’t regret being a barber,” he said. “It’s been a calling that I probably fell into. My wife would say I can’t go anywhere without people saying hi to me because I’ve touched so many people.” That journey started between Hudson’s junior and senior year, when he signed up for classes at Belleville Barber College.  After graduating a year later, Hudson served for 2.5 years as an apprentice barber, married his wife Carole and became a master barber in 1967.  On his second day of work, Hudson calculated how long he would need to work before he could retire.  “I tried to figure out how many days I’d have to do that kind of work,” the 75-year-old remembered as he chuckled. “Isn’t th...