Virulent Newcastle disease resurged in Southern California as people broke quarantines by moving birds and farming

Virulent Newcastle disease resurged in Southern California as people broke quarantines by moving birds and farming equipment, state authorities said. After two months without any known infections, state and federal authorities confirmed new ones starting in mid-November and continuing through the end of the year. Their investigation led to a community in San Bernardino County. “We now have 20 new cases under investigation, all linked to the recent Bloomington area outbreak,” State Veterinarian Annette Jones wrote in a Dec. 23, 2019, alert. By Dec. 31, all but three of the new infections were in San Bernardino County, with two in Riverside County and one in Los Angeles County, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture data. Virulent Newcastle disease is a contagious, untreatable, and deadly viral respiratory infection of birds. State and federal agriculture authorities have quarantined and depopulated poultry since the outbreak began in spring 2018. “As a reminder, last year the disease was spread from San Bernardino to LA and Riverside counties and beyond, leading to widespread highly infected areas, infected poultry farms, the death of over 1.2 million birds, and significant...

Private equity is snapping up refrigerated warehouses. That could make it harder for small food makers to

Private equity is snapping up refrigerated warehouses. That could make it harder for small food makers to sell their wares. While his friends played in the Florida sunshine, Elliot Greenbaum, then 11, was often bundled up in coat and hat, sweeping the floors in his dad’s refrigerated warehouse. As a teenager, he drove the forklift, loading Danish canned hams into station wagons bound for Cuban sandwich shops. Now 73, he’s closing the business he inherited from his Polish immigrant father, unable to compete in a $6 billion refrigerated storage industry dominated by institutional investors scaling up to serve the needs of food giants such as Unilever NV and Nestle SA. As a result, some of his smaller customers—which recently included a specialty frozen dog-food maker and a kombucha startup—are at risk of getting shut out of the cold. “We’re losing the exotic things that make America great,” says Greenbaum, who just sold his last warehouse. “Now other people far away are deciding how your ice cream should taste.” Cold storage is the kind of niche business that Wall Street long ignored—it amounts to just 3% of public warehouses—but now it has become its latest darling. Roughly two d...