Protecting pet food ingredients with durable, accurate ingredient handling systems | 2020-03-10

To maximize efficiency, processors may choose to automate some micro ingredients and not others. Source: ADM This article was published in the December 2019 issue of Pet Food Processing. Read it and other articles from this issue in our December digital edition. Many processing applications in the pet food and treat industry can be particularly harsh with high rates of very abrasive products, so equipment must be designed with tougher standards in mind from the ground up. In addition to being durable, equipment must be accurate, easy to clean and efficient to operate, and support food safety. Dave Carney, area sales manager at Bühler Aeroglide, Cary, NC, notes the increased sanitation requirements of today’s equipment have driven changes in how they are designed. “This requires more modularity and ease-of-access to enable customers to adhere to these demands,” he said. Jessica Stank, marketing manager for Lake Odessa, Mich.-based Automated Process Equipment Corporation (APEC), said the biggest trends she is seeing in material handling equipment are related to improvements in the level of efficiency they can provide. “[End users] are looking at ways to automate their process and...

Virulent Newcastle disease resurged in Southern California as people broke quarantines by moving birds and farming

Virulent Newcastle disease resurged in Southern California as people broke quarantines by moving birds and farming equipment, state authorities said. After two months without any known infections, state and federal authorities confirmed new ones starting in mid-November and continuing through the end of the year. Their investigation led to a community in San Bernardino County. “We now have 20 new cases under investigation, all linked to the recent Bloomington area outbreak,” State Veterinarian Annette Jones wrote in a Dec. 23, 2019, alert. By Dec. 31, all but three of the new infections were in San Bernardino County, with two in Riverside County and one in Los Angeles County, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture data. Virulent Newcastle disease is a contagious, untreatable, and deadly viral respiratory infection of birds. State and federal agriculture authorities have quarantined and depopulated poultry since the outbreak began in spring 2018. “As a reminder, last year the disease was spread from San Bernardino to LA and Riverside counties and beyond, leading to widespread highly infected areas, infected poultry farms, the death of over 1.2 million birds, and significant...

5,000 hens need rehoming or will be killed after Welsh slaughterhouse goes bust

A debt-ridden farm is attempting to rehome 5,000 chickens who will be slaughtered if they don’t find a new home. Beryl and Roger Hosking, owners of Happy Hens farm in South Yorkshire, have decided to sell their farm land, equipment and stock to repay their debts and save their home. The chickens are healthy, vaccinated, lay eggs and are available for £1.50 each or £1 each for anyone buying more than 100. Farm manager Ashley Ames, 20, told Derbyshire Live: “We are going to sell as many of the hens as we can – we want them all to go to new loving homes. “We don’t want any of the chickens to have to go to slaughter, but they all have to be gone by September 12, so we’re hoping there are people who will take them. “Fresh eggs are on another level to the ones you can buy in supermarkets. And you only need one or two chickens to have enough for a whole family. “We’ve got a few people coming to pick some hens up soon, but we still have around 4,000 that need homes before September 12.” The farm also has pygmy goats, cows, alpacas, and emus that will be up for sale from September 16, after the farm has been closed. Rachel Moore, a bird rescuer from Derby, said: “Someone told me that Ha...